Final Destination

The annual NASCAR Sprint Media Tour rolled to its conclusion on Thursday and the long-awaited confirmation of several rumored rule changes finally came.

And in the end there weren't any real surprises.

Yes the Sprint Cup Series car rear wing will go the way of the dinosaur and be replaced by a traditional spoiler. Testing will continue until the expected rollout most likely at the end of March.

Bump drafting through the corners at Talladega will be restored but the double yellow line rule stays in play. That was a bit of a curveball as most believed NASCAR would rescind the policy.

A bigger restrictor plate will be bolted on at Daytona, which will give drivers better throttle response and hopefully better racing.

And John Darby has indeed left his post as Sprint Cup Series Director to take a position overseeing competition within NASCAR, but will stay on until his replacement is in place.

Overall the presentation pretty much solidified what most had expected all week.

NASCAR CEO Brian France reiterated the "fans come first" mantra that the sanctioning body has been preaching of late, which really took hold when the double file restarts were put into place last year. And all of the changes outlined on Thursday continued to reiterate how important it was to respond to the fans' concerns about competition, better racing and even the look of a NASCAR stock car, which the traditional spoiler returning certainly addresses.

That's a good thing to be sure. But I also think NASCAR needs to continue to take that input, as well as feedvack from teams and drivers and sponsors and television partners, and make the best possible decisions for the good of the sport.

There's a bit of a danger in changing things too many times to suit the cries of fandom. It's impossible to make everyone happy whenever a change is considered or made and NASCAR should continue to be a governing body that makes hard decisions even if they aren't always embraced across the board.

Thursday's decisions were good ones and seem to be welcomed by most fans and drivers.

Now we'll see if what looks good on paper plays out on the place it counts the most - the race track.

Related Topics:

NASCAR Sprint Cup, 2010

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